Sweary links #19

Is April really the cruelest month? Not when you can divert yourself with sweary news, tweets, and music.

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The brilliant satirist, songwriter, and mathematician Tom Lehrer celebrated his 88th birthday on April 9. We raised a glass and chorused along with one of his most memorable ditties.

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Don’t kill the messenger: Amazon was criticized for selling kids’ T-shirt with slogan “I Don’t Speak Stupid Bitch.”

Nice to know it’s gender neutral.

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It’s right here in the fucking Scientific American: “Indeed, taboo words hold a particular purpose in our lexicon that other words cannot as effectively accomplish: to deliver intense, succinct and directed emotional expression.”

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“Telling a woman to cut out the cussing is just as sexist as telling a woman to smile.” A tale of double standards on an Australian reality show.

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Danish pop star Medina’s new single, “Forgabt (Jeg Fucking Elsker Dig),” shot to #1 on Danish iTunes. “The song is an emotional ballad with a big chorus, in which she laments the fact that ‘I FUCKING LOVE YOU’,” reports Scandipop.

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A local branch of UKIP, the right-wing British political party, was criticized (or criticised) for “disgusting” use of swears on Facebook. A Bolton councillor said the language was “ill-advised” but “not at the top of the scale in terms of offensive language.”

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Lexicographer and Strong Language contributor Jonathon Green explains “the sneaky agenda behind Donald Trump’s dirty mouth.”

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It’s been a very good season indeed for New York’s tabloids. Here’s the front page of the Daily News on April 7, giving a Bronx cheer to Republican presidential candidate and disliked person Ted Cruz.

tedcruz_fu_stronglang

It’s a win for the Fourth Estate when “lustily jeered,” “bungled,” and “nixes” make it onto the front page.

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“This whole industry fucking sucks and this little get-together you guys have here is like a private boys’ club and it’s a bunch of jackasses and jerks and fucking gangsters and crooks who’ve fucking stolen everything from a fucking artist.” — In a Rolling Stone interview, rocker Steve Miller shares a few thoughtful words about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. (H/t: Wendy Brandes.)

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No, it wasn’t an April Fools’ Day joke: the George Mason School of Law, in Washington, D.C., really did intend to rename itself the Antonin Scalia School of Law, after the late Supreme Court associate justice, known for his strict (some would say obdurate) devotion to the original meaning of the U.S. Constitution. That was before innumerable internet wags pointed out that the new acronym would be ASSol. Days after the first press release, the law school announced its new new name: The Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University. As a Wall Street Journal reader snarked: “Shouldn’t an originalist be honored by sticking with the original re-name?”

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(More on af — or as fuck — here. For lit, see Urban Dictionary.)

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The person who uploaded this photo to Imgur captioned it: “I too have a daughter who is going places.”

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Microsoft developed an artificial chatbot named Tay — for Teen Artificial Intelligence — that was designed to learn language from teens on Twitter. What could possibly go wrong? This: the company had to suspend Tay twice in late March for generating “wildly inappropriate” racist, sexist, and profane tweets. According to the Financial Times, “Tay appeared to endorse Hitler, conspiracy theories over the 9/11 terrorist attack, and Donald Trump’s plans to build a wall between the US and Mexico.”

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And speaking of chatbots:

2016-03-25-Chatbot

(Comic by Jonathan Rosenberg)

7 thoughts on “Sweary links #19

    • Nancy Friedman April 14, 2016 / 2:26 pm

      “I don’t speak, stupid bitch” and “I don’t speak stupid, bitch” would certainly have distinct connotations. Apparently the T-shirt designer is a fan of ambiguity.

      Like

  1. John Cowan April 14, 2016 / 5:06 pm

    It’s a great pity that English gave up the verb and noun fist ‘silent(ly) fart’, merging it with fart ‘nois(il)y fart’. The distinction apparently went back to Proto-Indo-European days, with some modern languages preserving one root, some the other.

    Like

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